Assessing and Improving Community Health in Wisconsin

Alcohol use

Wisconsin ranks highest among all states in binge drinking, an important risk factor for alcohol related injuries and deaths. The estimated cost of excessive alcohol consumption in Wisconsin was $6.8 billion in 2012. These costs are borne by everyone in the state.

Source:
Black PD, Paltzer JT. The Burden of Excessive Alcohol Use in Wisconsin. University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute, February 2013.

Diet & exercise

Poor nutrition includes under- or over-eating, not eating enough fruits and vegetables, and consuming excessive amounts of foods that are high in unhealthy fat, salt and sugar. Poor nutrition can lead to health problems including being overweight or obese, high blood pressure and high cholesterol, osteoporosis, depression and eating disorders. Fewer than one in four Wisconsin adults reports eating the recommended five servings of fruit or vegetables per day. In 2013, two out of three Wisconsin adults were overweight or obese, continuing a steady increase in obesity over the past decade. Obesity is known to contribute to Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Physical inactivity contributes to obesity, heart disease, diabetes, some cancers, elevated unhealthy cholesterol, and high blood pressure. More than 75% of Wisconsin adults reported participating in no leisure time physical activity or exercise in the prior month.

Sources:
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity.
    http://www.cdc.gov/nutrition/
    http://www.cdc.gov/stltpublichealth/psr/npao/
    http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/everyone/health/ 
Hatchell K, Roubal AM, Catlin BB, Timberlake K. Opportunities to Make Wisconsin the Healthiest State, University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute, 2015.
Trust for America’s Health. “Adult Obesity Rate in Wisconsin Could Reach 56.3 percent by 2030, According to New Study.”

Drug use

Drug use refers to the use of both legal and illegal drugs, including abuse of prescription drugs. Abuse of and addiction to legal and illegal drugs have negative consequences for individuals, their families and society, including harmful effects on health, workplace productivity, and crime.

Source:
National Institute on Drug Abuse. DrugFacts: Understanding Drug Abuse and Addiction. Revised November 2012.

Tobacco use

Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death in Wisconsin and the United States. Even though cigarette smoking has slowly declined among adults in Wisconsin, nearly one in five Wisconsin adults still smokes. Secondhand smoke In Wisconsin, health effects of smoking contribute to $1.95 billion in out of pocket healthcare spending and $1.7 billion in lost productivity annually.

Source:
Centers for Disease Control. Prevention Status Report: Tobacco use.

Access to care

Access to care includes access to primary and preventive health care, dental care, and mental health services for residents in Wisconsin. In 2012, approximately 10 percent of Wisconsin residents were uninsured. Having access to comprehensive, high quality, affordable health care affects an individual’s overall physical and mental health and well-being, as well as overall life expectancy.

Source:
Kaiser Family Foundation. Health Insurance Coverage of the Total Population.
HealthyPeople.gov. Access to Health Services.

Chronic disease

Chronic diseases and conditions—such as heart disease, stroke, cancer, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and arthritis—are among the most common, costly, and preventable of all health problems.

Source:
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Chronic Disease Overview.

Mental health

Wisconsin ranks highest among all states in binge drinking, an important risk factor for alcohol related injuries and deaths. The estimated cost of excessive alcohol consumption in Wisconsin was $6.8 billion in 2012. These costs are borne by everyone in the state.

Source:
Black PD, Paltzer JT. The Burden of Excessive Alcohol Use in Wisconsin. University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute, February 2013.